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Thunderstorm Rolls Through Lemoore

Thunderstorm Rolls Through Lemoore

Celeste Swift snapped this photo of the sky over Lemoore on Monday afternoon

Safety Tips in Stormy Weather

Safety Tips in Stormy Weather

 

With winter rain and thunderstorms that occur, wind can cause trees to blow over on power lines. Wet roads also cause traffic accidents that may result in autos hitting power poles. Electric power lines are designed to be out of the public’s reach.

When electric power lines fall to the ground they should be considered “live”, or energized, with electricity flowing. If you see a downed power line:  Don’t touch or try to move the power line, or anything in contact with it.  Do call 911.  Do keep yourself, children and animals far away. 

If a power line falls across a vehicle:  If you’re not in the vehicle, stay far away and keep others away while calling 911.  If you’re inside the vehicle, if it’s safe, stay in the car until help arrives. 

CA Snowpack Level Above Normal

CA Snowpack Level Above Normal

AP-Officials say several early season storms have pushed California's snowpack _ which supplies much of the state's water _ to well above normal levels.

The state Department of Water Resources said Wednesday that early electronic readings indicate that the water content of California's snowpack is 146 percent above normal for this time of year.

The snowpack usually provides a third of the water used by households, farms and industries across the state. The department says the early storms have also replenished many of the state's reservoirs. Among those showing increases for this time of year include Lake Oroville in Butte County at 111 percent above normal, and Shasta Lake north of Redding at 113 percent.

The DWR will conduct its first official snow survey next week.

Pea Soup Fog Makes San Joaquin Valley Notorious

Pea Soup Fog Makes San Joaquin Valley Notorious

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) - Safety experts are bracing for the two foggiest months of the year in California's San Joaquin Valley and hoping an intricate warning system continues to keep drivers safe.

Areas along Highway 99 south of Fresno are notorious for dense tule fog, a thick patchwork that materializes after rain an average of 35 days a year.

The sudden transition from sun to fog often catches drivers by surprise.

In 2007 a 108-vehicle pileup killed two people and closed 99 for half the day. Officials began planning then for a fog warning system along the highway's most dangerous 12 mile stretch south of Fresno.

Since 2010 Caltrans has operated six weather stations, 12 cameras, 39 electronic message signs and 41 microwave sensors that automatically warn drivers when conditions become dangerous.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Foggy Conditions: Which Headlights Should You Use?

Foggy Conditions: Which Headlights Should You Use?

The California Department of Motor Vehicles would like to remind everyone to use low beam headlights when driving in the fog.

Officials say you should not use high beam headlights because they can reflect back and cause glare.

The CHP offers these tips to help you stay safe on the road:

  • Turn off radio and cell phone
  • Slow down
  • Roll down your window and listen for traffic

Officials say if you are involved in a fog-related accident, the best thing you can do is pull as far off the road as possible, turn off the lights and keep your foot off the brake pedal.

For more safety tips, visit www.chp.ca.gov/html/fog-tips.html.

Track The Storm With The KMPH Radar

Track The Storm With The KMPH Radar

Wet weather is back in the Valley.

You can track the rain by clicking on this link: www.kmph.com/weather.

Heat Wave Continues: 'Flex Alert' Issued For Tuesday

Heat Wave Continues: 'Flex Alert' Issued For Tuesday

LOS ANGELES (AP) - The heat has yet to break, but Californians are being urged to turn down their air conditioners.

Operators of the state's electricity grid have declared a Flex Alert for Tuesday, telling customers to curb their power use as California's inland regions face yet another day of sky-high heat.

The California Independent System Operator says conservation will be critical with peak demand forecast at 47,500 megawatts.

Customers are being asked to set their air conditioners to 78 degrees or higher, to wait until after 7 p.m. to use major appliances and to turn off anything that isn't necessary.

A similar alert was issued for Friday.

The National Weather Service has issued excessive-heat warnings from Santa Barbara County through southeastern California and in much of the San Joaquin Valley.